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The White House is refusing to use THIS word to describe its activities in Iraq

In Washington, D.C., truth takes a backseat to politics every time.

The latest examples comes from the White House, which has refused to use the word “combat” to describe special operations activity in Iraq -- despite three U.S. casualties since the fight against ISIS began.

Fox News reports:

President Obama’s former defense secretary Robert Gates accused the White House on Thursday of “semantic backflips” for refusing to use the word “combat” to describe U.S. troops’ fight against the Islamic State, in the wake of another casualty.

"I think that is incredibly unfortunate not to speak openly about what is going on," Gates said on MSNBC’s “Morning Joe.”

He continued, "American troops are in action. They are being killed, they are in combat and these semantic backflips to avoid using the term ‘combat’ is a disservice to those who are out there putting their lives on the line."

Gates speculated that the reason for avoiding the term is political, as it fits the narrative that combat operations in Iraq have ended. He said current Defense Secretary Ash Carter acknowledges the troops are in combat, and it’s “unfortunate” the White House can’t do the same.

Carter indeed confirmed earlier this month the military had suffered a “combat death” after Special Warfare Operator 1st Class Charles Keating IV, a Navy SEAL, was killed near Irbil, Iraq by ISIS fire.

He was the third American servicemember to die in combat in Iraq since the start of the campaign against ISIS.

So not only is the White House deceiving the American people, it’s also dishonoring the men who have given their lives in the service of their country.

Political games will always be an unfortunate component of a free democracy. But those games should never take precedence over serving the American people honestly. Our federal officials have misplaced their priorities, and only an Article V Convention of States can force them to re-align.

A Convention of States can propose constitutional amendments that restore the balance of power between federal and state governments. These amendments can force Congress to be fiscally responsible, mandate term limits, and reduce the power and jurisdiction of federal regulators. But most of all, these amendments can serve to remind the feds that they work for the American people and have a duty to serve them with honor and integrity.

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