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Gallup: Poor government leadership top problem in 2014

Concern with government leadership was the top concern Americans had in 2014, according to a recent Gallup article:

In 2014, four issues generated enough public concern over enough months for at least 10% of Americans, on average, to identify each of them as the nation's most important problem. Complaints about government leadership -- including President Barack Obama, the Republicans in Congress and general political conflict -- led the list, at 18%. This was closely followed by mentions of the economy in general (17%), unemployment or jobs (15%) and healthcare (10%).

Beyond the top four issues, 6% mentioned the federal budget deficit or debt...

Government leadership and the national debt -- Convention of States supporters voice these concerns on an almost daily basis, and Gallup's polls prove many Americans share the same concerns.

Unfortunately, new government leadership has a nasty way of acting like old government leadership. Democrats and Republicans, Washington insiders and Washington outsiders -- once they arrive in D.C. they seem to forget who they serve and why they govern.

For example, how many Washington politicians do you know who arrive in Washington and immediately attempt to scale back federal spending? Not many. Why? Because their minds are on the next election cycle. Money ensures votes, and they're not about to jeopardize the next election by thinking about what's best for the country as a whole.

Government leadership isn't the real issue. Congressmen and Presidents will come and go, but the debt will continue to increase and power will continue to centralize. We don't have a people problem -- we have a structural problem.

The Supreme Court has interpreted the Constitution in a way that gives Congress and the President more power than ever before. It gives Congress the power to spend without limits and the President power to rule unilaterally.

Americans see this, and they know it's not right. They know their leadership governs unwisely and with too much power, but they don't know how to stop it. They don't know how to fix the structural problem at the root of the people problem.

A Convention of States, as outlined in Article V of the Constitution, gives concerned American a way to address that structural problem. The Article V process can propose and ratify constitutional amendments without the approval of the federal government. These amendments would state clearly the limits of Presidential and Congressional power. They would force Congress to be fiscally responsible and the President to act with Congress's approval.

Click here to learn more. If you'd like to get involved, you can volunteer for your state's Convention of States team on this page.